Dendro dating ireland

Some regions in Northern Europe at various times over-exhausted their native timber ressource, and needed to import timber from regions that had surplus.Using my provenance determination technique the chronology, geography and extent of the trade in building timber in Northern Europe is increasingly emerging.

Dendrochronology or tree-ring dating is the method by which timbers are precisely dated through measurement and analysis of the trees’ ring width.The variation in the tree-ring width, influenced by the annual climate variation during the trees’ growth, is the code used in dendrochronology.Definitions The Principle of Cognitive Classification The Principle of Crossdating The Prinicple of Trees as Dynamic Entities The Principle of Plurality and Parsimony The Principle of Aggregate Tree Growth The Principle of Limiting Factors The Principle of Replication across Spatiotemporal Scales The Principle of Site Selection (dendron = tree, chronos = time, logos = word = the science of): The science that uses tree rings dated to their exact year of formation to analyze temporal and spatial patterns of processes in the physical and cultural sciences.The science that uses tree rings to date when timber was felled, transported, processed, or used for construction or wooden artifacts.The central rings of this older tree may then be compared with the outer rings or a yet older tree, and so on until the dates reach back into prehistory.

Problems that arise are when climatic variation and suitable trees (sensitive trees react to climatic changes, complacent trees do not) are not be present to produce any significant and recognizable pattern of variation in the rings.

Carbon-14 dating techniques were first developed by the American chemist, Willard F.

Libby at the University of Chicago in the 50’s, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1960.

By comparing the pattern of wide and narrow rings from a timber of unknown age with tree-ring chronologies from Northern Europe, the precise chronological position of the measured tree-ring series from the timber can be found.

As the position of these chronologies is precisely dated by linking them with tree-ring data from living trees, an accurate date for the timber can be given.

This method is of particular importance to our study of the human past, when analysing shipwrecks, barrels, painted panels and artistic or eccliastical sculpture, as these particular objects were widely transported and traded.