Journals on dating preferences

Their findings all hold true even after taking into account differing demographic, physical and personality characteristics among the daters.

The richness of our data further allows us to identify many determinants of same-race preferences.

Subjects' backgrounds, including the racial composition of the ZIP code where a subject grew up and the prevailing racial attitudes in a subject's state or country of origin, strongly influence same-race preferences.

They make worse matches than just using a random site.

That’s because their matching criteria are hardly scientific, as far as romance goes.

Although many dating sites tout the superiority of partner matching through the use of “scientific algorithms,” the authors find that there is little evidence that these algorithms can predict whether people are good matches or will have chemistry with one another.

The authors’ overarching assessment of online dating sites is that scientifically, they just don’t measure up.

Lin and Lundquist found that when Internet daters search for potential mates, they are more likely to approach those of the same racial identity as themselves, and a clear racial hierarchy dominates the response process.

White daters’ messages are likely to elicit responses from daters of other groups, but white women respond mostly only to white men.

As online dating matures, however, it is likely that more and more people will avail themselves of these services, and if development — and use — of these sites is guided by rigorous psychological science, they may become a more promising way for people to meet their perfect partners. Finkel discuss the science behind online dating at the 24th APS Annual Convention.

About the Authors I agree wholeheartedly that so-called scientific dating sites are totally off-base.

Although the authors find that online dating sites offer a distinctly different experience than conventional dating, the superiority of these sites is not as evident.